Image sizing – trial and error

Images are vastly important to the success of your social media posts. If you missed our post about this, you can check it out here. But the main point is this: images make an impact. It is for this reason you need to make sure they fit the content you’re posting. This means ensuring the dimensions are correct, and the image works with the words you’re posting.

While it is easier than ever to access copyright free images, formatting them for your post isn’t always as simple. Size is a huge factor in formatting your image. Most social media channels have an upload limit. It is important to make sure your image falls below this image or else you won’t be able to post.

The first thing to check is what this limit is for the place you are posting. Often, the limit will be slightly different across each channel. Once you have checked the size limitations, it is a good idea to work out the dimensions required.

Worker measuring with a tape

Working out dimensions

For example, an image used as a “header” or “cover” will probably need to be rectangular. This means their width will be bigger than their height. While you will be able to crop an image, if it is not rectangular to start with, you will lose some of the image. Some of this will require trial and error, adjusting the size and ratio of your chosen images. Generally, a header image will be somewhere in the region of 600 x 200 pixels.

If you are posting an image in your blog post, you will probably need to preview its size and positioning a number of times before you figure out what works best. Be wary of the option to ‘wrap text’ around an image, as sometimes the formatting of your entire blog can be messed up if you do this.

At GL, we offer the same pricing for all sizes of an image; small, medium, and large. If you purchase a license to an image, you will have access to all sizes to play around with, and to find the perfect fit, while maintaining the pixel-perfect integrity of the image.

It’s also important to note that the value of vectors should not be overlooked. With vector files, you can efficiently scale up or down the size of the image, without any pixelation, or any quality loss. Although third party software is required to modify .eps vector files, it is well worth the effort.

The main thing is to try and see what works for you and your content. Different Content Managing Systems will require different aspect ratios, but the preview button exists for a reason!

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Michelle O'Connor

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